Applications are now being accepted through January 15, 2017.

Background

The Glorney-Raisbeck Fellowships Award in Cardiovascular Diseases is awarded in support of research projects seeking better understanding of the causes, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease and that will advance the academic careers of young physician investigators.

Eligibility Requirements

Candidates must be enrolled in an ACGME-approved clinical training program in cardiovascular diseases or in an ACGME-approved residency that will qualify for a planned clinical cardiovascular diseases training program.  The proposed research must be conducted at institutions located in New York City, Long Island, or Westchester County, New York, and fellows must commit at least eighty percent of their time to the funded project.

Candidates must hold a MD or equivalent degree, must be United States citizens, permanent residents or have, at the time of application, a valid working visa that can be renewed (if required) through the period of the award.  Candidates on a working visa who receive the award should note that if their visa is not renewed at any point during the grant period, the award will be revoked and all funds required to be refunded to the grantor.

Renewal of awards to previous recipients will be considered on a competitive basis.

For those individuals who may not meet these criteria, please email the program at fellows@nyam.org and exceptional circumstances may be considered.

Selection Guidelines and Procedures

The Glorney-Raisbeck Selection Committee of The New York Academy of Medicine reviews all applications and supporting materials and recommends award recipients for ratification by the Trustees of the Academy. The review of applications will be weighed 25% on the applicant, 25% on the environment and 50% on the project. Additionally, the Committee’s evaluation will include that candidates be judged on their data analysis plan. A personal interview may be required. Candidates will be advised of their status by late March.

Application Process

Applicants must complete an online application that requires uploading certain materials and forms:

  1. A signed cover letter describing previous training and experience and how the proposed activities relate to the applicant’s projected career.
  2. Your education and research experience (the online application contains a specific form to be uploaded and completed)
  3. A description of project facilities (the online application contains a specific form to be uploaded and completed)
  4. A project budget (the online application contains a specific form to be uploaded and completed)
  5. A description of the applicant's research career goals (the online application contains a specific form to be uploaded and completed)
  6. A research proposal that includes the project title, applicant’s name, research site, introduction, specific aims, work done by others, work done by applicant, methods of procedure, significance, potential obstacles and relevant bibliography. This should not exceed four (4) pages, including diagrams, illustrations, bibliography and any other supplemental materials.
  7. A curriculum vitae
  8. A signed letter of support from applicant's research sponsor detailing your career development plan, providing a description of the research environment and available research facilities to be provided for the proposed project, providing an analysis of your clinical and research training and affirming that the sponsor has evaluated and approved your proposed application
  9. An NIH biosketch of the research sponsor (sample provided in the online application)
  10. A signed letter of recommendation from the department chair or division director at the institution where your research will take place, describing the facilities and faculty resources available for career development, explaining how the proposed research will prepare you for an academic career and affirming that he or she has evaluated and approved your proposed application.
  11. Documentation of IRB or IACUC protocol approval, proof of submission, or waiver (if applicable). The complete protocol is not required, only the appropriate approval or submission cover page. Approvals for pending protocols must be in place by the start of the grant. In the case of animal research, include a copy of the institution’s current HHS Animal Welfare Assurance approval or renewal letter, or a letter from the institution’s research administration office affirming that the animal facility complies with all federal standards and has been so certified.
  12. Signed certification letter from your institutional Grants or Finance Office accepting responsibility for overseeing this grant and stating that the official accepts the conditions outlined in the Academy Patent Policy (policy available online for download).

To begin the application process, click on the link below. You will be asked to complete an eligibility quiz. Provided that you meet the program eligibility requirements, you will then be asked to register by creating a login and password. With your login and password, you will be able to access the online application, including the forms that you must upload and complete.

CLICK HERE TO APPLY ONLINE

The application should work in all browsers. We recommend that you use Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer.

Award Information

One-year fellowship awards of $70,000 each are available for research commencing in July of the application year. Awards will be paid directly to the sponsoring institution. At least $55,000 of the grant must be dedicated to support the awardee’s salary. The remainder of the award may be used for fringe benefits and indirect costs (indirect costs may not exceed 15 percent). Laboratory expenses are not covered by this grant. Grant recipients are required to submit progress and financial reports to NYAM at the mid-point and end of the grant period. Failure to comply with reporting requirements may result in termination of the grant and refund of any award monies paid, and may negatively affect consideration of future applications from the grantee’s institution.

Contact information

Office of Trustee & Fellowship Affairs
The New York Academy of Medicine
1216 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10029-5202
Tel: 212-419-3544
Fax: 212-419-3615
email: fellows@nyam.org


Current & Previous Recipients
2015-2016

Adam Castaño, MD

Technetium Pyrophosphate Cardiac Imaging to Determine if Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis Explains Paradoxical Low-Flow Severe Aortic Stenosis

Research conducted at Columbia University

Amy Kontorovich, MD

Modeling Myocarditis with Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Research conducted at Mount Sinai Medical Center

Joshua Lader, MD

Mechanisms of K(ATP) Channel Activation in Adrenergically-Mediated Atrial Fibrillation

Research conducted at New York University School of Medicine

Nathaniel Langer, MD

The Role of Myostatin in Right Ventricular Dysfunction during Pressure Overload

Research conducted at Columbia University

2014-2015

Kanwal Farooqi, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center

Creation and Validation of Low Cost 3D Cardiac Models from MRI in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease

2013-2014

Yongxia Sarah Qu, MD, PhD

SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Novel function of alpha1D L-type calcium channel in atria
 

Nisharahmed Kherada, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center, Icahn School of Medicine

Antiplatelet Adherence Algorithm From Paris Registry

Matthew Egalka, MD

Columbia University Medical Center

Assessing the Thrombogenic Potential of Neonatal Platelets
 

2012-2013

Daria B. Crittenden, MD

NYU School of Medicine

Effects of Colchicine on Cardiovascular Disease: Colchicine Use and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Gout

2011-2012

Lori K. Soni, MD

Columbia University Medical Center

The TASK-1 Channel in Atrial Fibrillation as a Selective, Therapeutic Target

2010-2011

Usman Baber, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on Blood Thromobogenicity and Response to Clopidogrel

Joshua M. Lader, MD

New York University School of Medicine

Arrhythmogenic Mechanism of K(ATP) Channel Activation in Hypertension

2009-2010

Steven F. Giovannone, MD

New York University School of Medicine

Developmental Gene Expression of the Purkinje Fiber Network

James R. Kneller, MD, MSc, PhD

New York University

Role of the Inflammatory Response to Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation in Determining Ablation Efficacy

Constance G. Weismann, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine

RAF1 mutations causing Noonan Sydrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterization of phenotype in the fly model and identification of new treatment strategies with high-throughput pharmacological screen

2008-2009

Sammy Elmariah, MD

The Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Effects of Bisphosphonates on the Progression of Aortic Valve Calcification

Benjamin F. Remo, MD

New York University School of Medicine

The Role of Post-translational Phosphorylation of Gap Junction Proteins in Gap Junction Remodeling

2007-2008

Eugene E. Kim, MD

New York University School of Medicine

The Role of Cardiac Fibroblasts in Electrical Impulse Propagation

Roland S. Wu, MD

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

The Role of p27kip1 Phosphorylation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Proliferation and Migration

2006-2007

Rose S. Cohen, MD

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

The Effect of Erythropoietin on Left Ventricular Remodeling and Pressure-Volume Relationships in Patients with Anemia and Diastolic Heart Failure

2005-2006

Eric D. Adler, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Isolation and Functional Characterization of Cardiac Pacemaker Cells from Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiac Precursor Cells

Elaine Y. Chiang, MD

Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Investigation of Leucocyte Recruitment in Sickle Cell Vasoocclusion

Prashant Kaul, MBBCh

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

The Role of the Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Lsc/p115 Rho GEF in Neutrophil Polarization and Chemotaxis

2004-2005

Nathalie D. Burg, MD

Rockefeller University

Platelet TGF-B1 Compartmentalization and Activation

Nellie I. Kalcheva, MD

New York University Medical Center

The Cardiac System and its Function in a Murine Model for Oculodentodigital Dysplasia (ODDD)

Alfonso F. J. Prieto, MD

Columbia University Medical Center

Electrophysiologic Characterization of a Mouse Model of Heart Failure and Cardiac Arrhythmias

2003-2004

Sanjeev Arokiasamy Francis, MD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Determining the Role of a Eeyore, a Novel Rho GEF in Macrophage Chemotaxis and Phagocytosis

Nikhil Vilas Munshi, MD, PhD

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Molecular Determinants of Cardiac Conduction System Development

Xander Hennie Wehrens, M.D., Ph.D.

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Functional Characterization of Ryanodine Receptor Type 2 Mutations Linked to Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Type 2 (ARVD2)

2002-2003

Quynh Anh Truong, MD

The Rockfeller University

Expression and Functional Analyses of a Novel Mouse Gene mhrp 1 and Its role in Atherosclerosis

William Jacob Mack, MD

Columbia University

Complement Mediated Injury in Murine Stroke

2001-2002

Sei Iwai, MD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

A Molecular Genetic Basis For Familial Atrial Fibrillation

Kent M. Stephenson, MD

Mount Sinai Medical Center

Macrophages and Arterial Injury

Carrie M. Brownstein, MD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

The Role of Annexin II in Monocyte and Macrophage Function

Renewal of Award 2001-2002

Charles J. Vaughen, MD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Molecular Genetic Analysis of Familial Aortic Aneurysms

2000-2001

Yi-Ming Yang, MD

New York-Presbyterian Medical Center

Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of the Cardiac IP3 Receptor

Charles J. Vaughan, MD

Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Molecular Genetic Analysis of Familial Aortic Aneurysms

1999-2000

No Fellowships Awarded

1998-1999

Hayes M. Dansky, MD

The Rockefeller University

HDL and Atherosclerosis

Detlef Wencker, MD

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Role of Cardiac Myocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Ischemic Injury